TELESIS CORPORATION

Telesis Ellen Wilson

With an elegance that complements the historic architecture of the Capitol Hill neighborhood, this cooperative housing serving all races and incomes has received eight national awards for excellence. The Ellen Wilson neighborhood revitalization is nationally recognized as one of the most creative solutions to replacing abandoned, formally segregated public housing.

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Court Square Park lies in the heart of downtown Memphis, a symbolic center of the city. Local preservationists and developers asked Telesis to join them in an effort to preserve, rebuild, and revitalize these unique buildings.

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Telesis Court Square
Telesis Court Square

Court Square Park lies in the heart of downtown Memphis, a symbolic center of the city. Local preservationists and developers asked Telesis to join them in an effort to preserve, rebuild, and revitalize these unique buildings.

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The Barclay neighborhood is located in central Baltimore, a mid-point between Johns Hopkins University and the Baltimore Harbor. Telesis has been working with the community and other local stakeholders for the past 10 years to regenerate over 20 city blocks into a beautiful mixed-income, rental and homeownership community with retail and high-quality green space.

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Telesis has a long and continuing engagement with the revitalization of the Parkside neighborhood in Northeast Washington, serving as master planner, developer, and financier.

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Telesis Parkside

Telesis has a long and continuing engagement with the revitalization of the Parkside neighborhood in Northeast Washington, serving as master planner, developer, and financier.

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LATEST NEWS

FEBRUARY 15, 2017 | LIVE Baltimore

On the final Friday of every month, Live Baltimore heads out of the office and into one of Baltimore’s 277 neighborhoods. Each month, we love what we find! January was no different.

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Tour Barclay with us!

JANUARY 27, 2017 | The Baltimore Sun

On a windy February day in 1999, I toured the Barclay community with leaders who were trying to preserve a neighborhood later described in news coverage as "collapsed." There were rubble-strewn blocks and vacant and abandoned houses. The neighborhood's main thoroughfare was an eyesore, a street other reporters at The Sun called "gritty Greenmount."

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Barclay Transforming from 'Gritty Greenmount' to Trendy New Haven